On the Oasis of Mara
73950 Inn Avenue, Twentynine Palms, CA 92277
Phone (760) 367-3505  FAX (760) 367-4425
email: theoasis@29palmsinn.com

leaf scroll
29 Palms Inn Logo small
29 Palms Inn Logo Sketch
On the Oasis of Mara
73950 Inn Avenue,
Twentynine Palms, CA 92277

Phone (760) 367-3505 
FAX (760) 367-4425
email: theoasis@29palmsinn.com
leaf scroll

Birding at the Oasis of Mara

Bird watching at the Oasis of Mara
In 1929 the Oasis of Mara was descried as a fan palm oasis
with four ponds which regularly overflowed about a half
mile to the north out into the desert. We now know that the
Oasis of Mara formed along the Pinto Mountain Faultline
approximately 9,000 years ago and water has been
available since. Undoubtedly, birds immediately found this
water source.

The Oasis offers all the essentials for migrating birds such
as food and water, and cover, to rest, escape predators, get
out of the sun, and in the springtime a place to nest. The
Oasis can be seen from above, and from far away, with the
mile-long green line of Washingtonia palms saying “land
here”.

Over the years there have been 180 different types of birds
documented here on our grounds, 127 of which have been
added to the eBird database.

We invite you to come birding at the 29 Palms Inn, and to
participate by submitting all observations to the eBird
database. This database provides scientists, researchers
and naturalists with real-time data about bird distribution
and by submitting your findings it not only allows
researchers to learn more about the birds you find, but also,
and equally important, the birds the you didn't find in the
area. All of this information combined helps researchers
better understand bird behavior in response to
environmental change.


This checklist is a quick look at what one might expect to find as you stroll the grounds of
the Inn or take the Oasis of Mara Nature Trail from the Joshua Tree National Park Visitors
Center. The most common types are marked with a C on the list. Depending on the time of
year more migrants will be observed. 
In 1929 the Oasis of Mara was described as a fan palm oasis with four ponds which
regularly overflowed about a half mile to the north. We now know that the Oasis of Mara
formed along the Pinto Mountain Faultline approximately 9,000 years ago and water has
been available since. Undoubtedly, birds immediately found this water source.

The Oasis offers all the essentials for migrating birds such as food and water, and cover, to
rest, escape predators, get out of the sun, and in the springtime a place to nest. The Oasis
can be seen from above, and from far away, with the mile-long green line of Washingtonia
palms saying “land here”.

Over the years there have been 180 different types of birds documented here on our
grounds, 127 of which have been added to the eBird database.

We invite you to come birding at the 29 Palms Inn, and to participate by submitting all
observations to the eBird database. This database provides scientists, researchers and
naturalists with real-time data about bird distribution and by submitting your findings it
not only allows researchers to learn more about the birds you find, but also, and equally
important, the birds the you didn't find in the area. All of this information combined helps
researchers better understand bird behavior in response to environmental change.

29 Palms Inn Bird List

In 1929 the Oasis of Mara was descried as a fan palm oasis with four ponds
which regularly overflowed about a half mile to the north out into the desert.
We now know that the Oasis of Mara formed along the Pinto Mountain
Faultline approximately 9,000 years ago and water has been available since.
Undoubtedly, birds immediately found this water source.

The Oasis offers all the essentials for migrating birds such as food and water,
and cover, to rest, escape predators, get out of the sun, and in the springtime
a place to nest. The Oasis can be seen from above, and from far away, with
the mile-long green line of Washingtonia palms saying “land here”.

Over the years there have been 180 different types of birds documented here
on our grounds, 127 of which have been added to the eBird database.

We invite you to come birding at the 29 Palms Inn, and to participate by
submitting all observations to the eBird database. This database provides
scientists, researchers and naturalists with real-time data about bird
distribution and by submitting your findings it not only allows researchers to
learn more about the birds you find, but also, and equally important, the
birds the you didn't find in the area. All of this information combined helps
researchers better understand bird behavior in response to environmental
change.

This checklist is a quick look at what one might expect to find as you stroll
the grounds of the Inn or take the Oasis of Mara Nature Trail from the Joshua
Tree National Park Visitors Center. The most common types are marked with
a C on the list. Depending on the time of year more migrants will be
observed. Please report any new sightings not found on the list.
This checklist is a quick look at what one might expect to
find as you stroll the grounds of the Inn or take the Oasis
of Mara Nature Trail from the Joshua Tree National Park
Visitors Center. The most common types are marked with
a C on the list. Depending on the time of year more
migrants will be observed. Please report any new sightings
not found on the list.
In 1929 the Oasis of Mara was descried as a fan
palm oasis with four ponds which regularly
overflowed about a half mile to the north out into
the desert. We now know that the Oasis of Mara
formed along the Pinto Mountain Faultline
approximately 9,000 years ago and water has been
available since. Undoubtedly, birds immediately
found this water source.

The Oasis offers all the essentials for migrating
birds such as food and water, and cover, to rest,
escape predators, get out of the sun, and in the
springtime a place to nest. The Oasis can be seen
from above, and from far away, with the mile-long
green line of Washingtonia palms saying “land
here”.

Over the years there have been 180 different types
of birds documented here on our grounds, 127 of
which have been added to the eBird database.

We invite you to come birding at the 29 Palms Inn,
and to participate by submitting all observations to
the eBird database. This database provides
scientists, researchers and naturalists with real-
time data about bird distribution and by submitting
your findings it not only allows researchers to learn
more about the birds you find, but also, and equally
important, the birds the you didn't find in the area.
All of this information combined helps researchers
better understand bird behavior in response to
environmental change.

This checklist is a quick look at what one might
expect to find as you stroll the grounds of the Inn
or take the Oasis of Mara Nature Trail from the
Joshua Tree National Park Visitors Center. The
most common types are marked with a C on the
list. Depending on the time of year more migrants
will be observed. Please report any new sightings
not found on the list.
In 1929 the Oasis of Mara was
descried as a fan palm oasis with
four ponds which regularly
overflowed about a half mile to
the north out into the desert. We
now know that the Oasis of Mara
formed along the Pinto Mountain
Faultline approximately 9,000
years ago and water has been
available since. Undoubtedly, birds
immediately found this water
source.

The Oasis offers all the essentials
for migrating birds such as food
and water, and cover, to rest,
escape predators, get out of the
sun, and in the springtime a place
to nest. The Oasis can be seen
from above, and from far away,
with the mile-long green line of
Washingtonia palms saying “land
here”.

Over the years there have been
180 different types of birds
documented here on our grounds,
127 of which have been added to
the eBird database.

We invite you to come birding at
the 29 Palms Inn, and to
participate by submitting all
observations to the eBird
database. This database provides
scientists, researchers and
naturalists with real-time data
about bird distribution and by
submitting your findings it not
only allows researchers to learn
more about the birds you find, but
also, and equally important, the
birds the you didn't find in the
area. All of this information
combined helps researchers better
understand bird behavior in
response to environmental
change.

This checklist is a quick look at
what one might expect to find as
you stroll the grounds of the Inn
or take the Oasis of Mara Nature
Trail from the Joshua Tree
National Park Visitors Center.
The most common types are
marked with a C on the list.
Depending on the time of year
more migrants will be observed.
Please report any new sightings
not found on the list.

Instagram Icom
Facebook Icon
Twitter Icon
Google Plus icon